Mid Week Quote: Edmund Hillary

Happy Wednesday!

I hope everyone is having a good week so far and if you are not I hope your week will start to get better.

My chosen quote this week is by the climber Edmund Hillary (1919-2008), who along with Tenzing Norgay became the first climber to reach the summit of Mount Everest. What made Hillary different from other climbers was that instead of focusing on the physical needs of the climb he focused on the mindset needed to achieve the summit.

 

“It is not the mountain we conquer but ourselves.”

Edmund Hillary

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Toodles for now.

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Star Trek Discovery: The Way to the Stars by Una McCormack (Review)

Star Trek Discovery: The Way to the Stars by Una McCormack

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About the author

Una_McCormack

Una McCormack is the author of seven previous Star Trek novels and four Doctor Who novels. She has also written numerous short stories and audio dramas. She lives in Cambridge, England, with her partner of many years and their daughter.

Blurb

Despite being an inexperienced Starfleet cadet, Sylvia Tilly became essential to the U.S.S. Discovery finding its way back home from the Mirror Universe. But how did she find that courage? From where did she get that steel? Who nurtured that spark of brilliance.

It’s not easy being sixteen, especially when everyone expects the best from Tilly. It’s even harder when her mother and father are Federation luminaries pressing her to attend one the best schools that the Federation has to offer. Tilly desires to achieve great things-even though she hasn’t quite worked out how to do that or what it is she wants to do. But this year, everything will change for Tilly, as she is about to embark upon the adventure of a lifetime- an adventure that will take her ever closer to the stars…

Review

This is the fourth Star Trek Discovery book I have read and another that I loved. I love how the books tie in so brilliantly with the TV series and give you such excellent back stories. I have preordered the next one and I can not wait for it to arrive on my door mat!

I found this a wonderful little story of a young girl becoming a young woman and most importantly finding out her true self and worth. Poor Tilly has spent her life trying to please her mother, father, grandmother and Quinn her grandmother’s husband. She has always tried to be her best at everything but it has not always made her happy. It was fascinating to learn how Tilly entered Starfleet and where she got her bravery and confidence.

Tilly is adorable if rather awkward and at one point dam right rude and in need of a good shake and somebody teaching her some manners but somehow I always found myself forgiving her.

I really did not like Tilly’s mother in this book and was pleased she did not feature greatly in the book, the woman was every child’s worst nightmare. I am surprised Tilly did not turn out very differently with that much pressure in her life. Tilly’s dad is quite different but really should have stuck up for Tilly better and been there more for her.

The other element I really liked was seeing Michael Burnham in a totally different light, although she did not really feature in the book the part she was in was lovely and showed her to be an amazing friend to have in your corner.

This book read very much like a YA book but that did not effect my opinion of it or my enjoyment. If it was not for the reason I needed sleep to go to work in the morning I would have not put it down. The only reason I did not give the book a full 5 Dragons and only 4 was because the ending was a little bit too perfect for my liking. This is a fantastic read and I highly recommend it to any Star Trek fan.

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To Purchase

Waterstones

Book Depository

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Summer Reading Challenge: Short and Sweet

I have suddenly realised that my Summer Reading is fast approaching and I have not yet decided on all the books I will reading.

I still have not decided on The Book is Better but hopefully will have that decided this week.

This book prompt Short and Sweet: Read a book with less than 100 pages, I’m not entirely sure on as I could read any of my little Penguin black books in one session. However, I have decided to check out some other options as well to see what else might be about.

157993Moral allegory and spiritual autobiography, The Little Prince is the most translated book in the French language. With a timeless charm it tells the story of a little boy who leaves the safety of his own tiny planet to travel the universe, learning the vagaries of adult behaviour through a series of extraordinary encounters. His personal odyssey culminates in a voyage to Earth and further adventures.

 

 

 

 

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First published in 1903, The Call of the Wild is regarded as Jack London’s masterpiece. Based on London’s experiences as a gold prospector in the Canadian wilderness and his ideas about nature and the struggle for existence, The Call of the Wild is a tale about unbreakable spirit and the fight for survival in the frozen Alaskan Klondike

 

 

 

 

 

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A very young woman’s first job: governess for two weirdly beautiful, strangely distant, oddly silent children, Miles and Flora, at a forlorn estate…An estate haunted by a beckoning evil.

Half-seen figures who glare from dark towers and dusty windows- silent, foul phantoms who, day by day, night by night, come closer, ever closer. With growing horror, the helpless governess realizes the fiendish creatures want the children, seeking to corrupt their bodies, possess their minds, own their souls…

But worse-much worse- the governess discovers that Miles and Flora have no terror of the lurking evil.

For they want the walking dead as badly as the dead want them.

 

These are a few thoughts so far. I will have a good think and work out what I might like to read in one sitting. I’m starting the challenge on 21st June the first day of summer.

Any thoughts please drop me a comment.

Happy Reading!

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The Confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins (Review)

The Confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins

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About the Author

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Sara Collins studied Law at the London School of Economics and worked as a lawyer for seventeen years. In 2014 she embarked upon the Creative Writing Masters at Cambridge University, where she won the 2015 Michael Holroyd Prize for Recreative Writing and was shortlisted for the 2016 Lucy Cavendish Prize for a book inspired by her love of Gothic Fiction. This turned into her first novel, The Confessions of Frannie Langton.

Blurb

1826, and all of London is in a frenzy. Crowds gather at the gates of the Old Bailey to watch as Frannie Langton, maid to Mr and Mrs Benham, goes on trial for their murder. The testimonies against her are damning – slave, whore, seductress. And they may be the truth. But they are not the whole truth.

For the first time Frannie must tell her story. It begins with a girl learning to read on a plantation in Jamaica, and it ends in a grand house in London, where a beautiful woman waits to be freed.

But through her fevered confessions, one burning question haunts Frannie Langton: could she have murdered the only person she ever loved?

Review

I must admit I was really excited to get this book and read it after seeing it on Facebook with rave reviews. I was also really pleased to get a signed copy from Waterstones. So it was moved to the top of my TBR pile. Sadly, I was very disappointed.

I found this book really annoying, when I first started it I was happily reading away, however it then began to get on my nerves and I was reluctant to keep going. I even stopped reading it for about a week but did return because I wanted to know what happened at the end.

I’m not entirely sure what it was that got on my nerves so much but I think it was the writing style. It just made me reluctant to pick the book up and read it. I also did not like the fact that the blurb pointed that there would be more of a trial being featured and sadly there was hardly any of the trial in the story, it just felt like an afterthought added at the end.

This book includes many themes, slavery, drug abuse, abuse, depression and much more and I think overall there are too many themes covered and it makes the story murky. I also found that certain elements of the story were highly predictable and that made it rather dull to read at times.

Overall, I felt no sympathy for the characters especially Frannie and some of them really got on my nerves, mainly Madame. I felt no real love for the story and will not be reading it again. Most people I am sure will enjoy this book but sadly it was just not my cup of tea. I have given this book 2 out of 5 Dragons.

Purchase links

Waterstones

Book Depository

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Mid Week Quote: Franz Kafka

We are half way through the week so that must mean it is quote time.

This weeks quote is by Franz Kafka. Kafka was a Czech author, most of his work was published after his death. Kafka instructed his friend Max Brod to burn all his work once he died, however Brod ignored these instructions and instead got Kafka’s work published.

 

“A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us.”

Franz Kafka

(Letter to Oskar Pollak 1904)

 

Happy reading everyone.

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ABC Book Challenge

Hello everyone, I hope you all had a good weekend.

I’m returning to the ABC Book Challenge this week for the letter C.

To see my previous posts please click on the links.

A | B |

 

Books I have loved beginning with C.

 

Carpe Jugulum by Terry Pratchett

Caste-Off by Jeffrey Archer

The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

Celtic Saints by Martin Wallace, Ann MacDuff

Chocolat by Joanne Harris

Christina Rosenthal by Jeffrey Archer

Christmas at the Beach Hut by Veronica Henry

A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett

Coming Home by Rosamunde Pilcher

Coming Home by Michael Morpurgo

Coraline and Other Stories by Neil Gaiman

The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths

 

Books on my TBR list beginning with C

Casino Royale by Ian Fleming

Catch – 22 by Joseph Heller

Charlotte Bronte: A Fiery Heart by Claire Harman

Circe by Madeline Miller

Circe and the Cyclops by Homer

City of Bones by Cassandra Clare

Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Cross Her Heart by Sarah Pinborough

 

 

Well that is another letter done! Some very good books on the TBR list.

I hope you all have a good week.

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Happy Birthday Thomas Hardy

Happy Birthday to you!

Happy Birthday to you!

Happy Birthday dear Hardy!

Happy Birthday to YOU!

 

Yes, today is the day that Thomas Hardy was born in 1840. As I might have mentioned a few times already, I love the novels of Thomas Hardy and am beginning to love his poetry as well.

Hardy was an English novelist and poet. His work was influenced by Romanticism and focused heavily on the failings of Victorian society, especially on the struggle of people living in rural areas. Hardy wrote poetry all of his life but his first works of poetry were not published till 1898. He was first known as a novelist before his poetry took hold with the general public.

I have read a few of Hardy’s books and I intend to one day read them all. My current favourite is A Pair of Blue Eyes which I have read more than once. I love the fact that he was influenced by his own courtship of his wife Emma for this book.

Anyway that is my brief little homage to Thomas Hardy.

I would love to hear your thoughts on Thomas Hardy.

Happy Birthday Mr Hardy and thank you for your amazing legacy.

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