Friday Poetry

Happy Friday my wonderful Book Dragons!

I hope you all have an amazing weekend planned.

My chosen poem this week is by Tony Mitton. Mitton is a children’s author and poet.

 

Days

Old day, gold day,

where did you go?

 

Over the skyline,

sinking low.

Into the arms

of the waiting night

to nestle myself

in its dark delight.

 

New day, blue day,

what will you bring?

 

Light in the sky

and a song to sing.

Sun bobs brightly

up with the dawn,

spreading warmth

as the day is born.

 

Tony Mitton

 

Have a good day everyone.

Happy reading.

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Friday Poetry

Morning everyone!

After an amazing dog walk yesterday, I decided to choose a poem with a dog theme. Coco went on her biggest walk since her operation yesterday and managed to get to the top of Kinver Edge. She also dragged my husband and myself at top speed around the route that should of taken 45mins and we did it in 30mins. Not bad for a woof woof with three legs!

The chosen poem is by Ogden Nash. Frederic Ogden Nash (1902-1971) was an American poet known for his unconventional rhyming schemes. He wrote over 500 pieces in his lifetime.

 

“The Dog”

The Truth I do not stretch or shove

When I state that the dog is full of love.

I’ve also found, by actual test,

A wet dog is the lovingest.

Ogden Nash

 

Happy Friday Everyone!

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May 2019 Wrap Up

Well another month is over and a new one has begun, so I thought I had better reflect on May. In my reflection of May I realise just how little reading I did. No wonder I’ve felt stressed, if I don’t read enough I always get grumpy. June I must read more!

Firstly, I would like to say a big thank you for all the likes and comments in May and also a big hello to my new followers, I hope you will enjoy reading my blog.

There were good elements of May on the blog, for one thing we celebrated Star Wars Day and I have decided to tackle my first every reading challenge over the Summer, which I am very excited about.

Sadly, I only managed to read 5 rather short books over May. Here they are (if you click the picture it will take you to the review):-

Star Sullivan by Maeve Binchy

9780752879543

128 pages

3/5 Dragons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Under the Garden by Graham Greene

115390

87 pages

3/5 Dragons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Brontesaurus: An A-Z of Charlotte, Emily and Anne Bronte (and Branwell) by John Sutherland

29363456

176 pages

5/5 Dragons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Immortal City by Amy Kuivalainen

44953207

324 pages

5/5 Dragons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Too Many Coincidences by Jeffrey Archer

38472435

40 pages

1/5 Dragons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total pages:- 755

Total pages this year so far: 7420

Rather disappointing I know but fingers crossed for a better month in June.

 

Poems Celebrated in May 2019

Desiderata by Max Ehrmann

Life by Charlotte Bronte

There Is No Frigate Like A Book by Emily Dickinson

Mary Celeste by Judith Nicholls

The Throstle by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

 

Quotes Celebrated in May 2019

Laozi

William Congreve

Robert Frost

George Eliot

Claude Debussy

 

So that is my month of May, hopefully June will be better on the reading front. I hope you all had a good May and have some exciting plans for June.

Please drop me a link to your May Wrap Ups I would love to read them.

Happy Reading.

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Friday Poetry

Happy Friday!

I am very sorry this post is a little late today, I’ve fallen rather behind with my blogging and reading but plan on getting back on form in June.

With all the lovely sunshine we have been having I decided on an appropriate poem to celebrate and what better poet to choose but the longest serving Poet Laureate in history. Can you guess who it is? He served as Poet Laureate from 1850 to his death in 1892. He was also a favourite poet of Queen Victoria, who found his poems soothing after the death of her husband Prince Albert.

Lets see if you can work out who it is by the end of the poem.

 

The Throstle

‘Summer is coming, summer is coming.

I know it, I know it, I know it.

Light again, leaf again, life again, love again,’

Yes, my wild little Poet.

 

Sing the new year in under the blue.

Last year you sang it as gladly.

‘New, new, new, new! Is it then so new

That you should carol so madly?

 

‘Love again, song again, nest again, young again,’

Never a prophet so crazy!

And hardly a daisy as yet, little friend,

See, there is hardly a daisy.

 

‘Here again, here, here, here, happy year!’

O warble unchidden, unbidden!

Summer is coming, is coming, my dear,

And all the winters are hidden.

 

Alfred, Lord Tennyson

 

Hope you managed to work it out.

Have a good weekend everyone and I hope you all have some wonderful sunshine to sit and read in.

Photo was taken at a recent day out at Daniel’s Mill Bridgnorth.

 

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Friday Poetry

Today’s chosen poem was chosen because I have always been interested in the mystery of Mary Celeste. The Mary Celeste washed up on the shores of the Azores islands on the 5th December 1872, the crew were nowhere to be seen, the cargo was undisturbed and the ship was completely unscathed and still able to sail. The mystery still remains unsolved.

Mary Celeste

Only the wind sings
in the riggings,
the hull creaks a lullaby;
a sail lifts gently
like a message
pinned to a vacant sky.
The wheel turns
over bare decks,
shirts flap on a line;
only the song of the lapping waves
beats steady time…


First mate,
off-duty from
the long dawn watch, begins
a letter to his wife, daydreams
of home.

The Captain’s wife is late;
the child did not sleep
and breakfast has passed…
She, too, is missing home;
sits down at last to eat,
but can’t quite force
the porridge down.
She swallows hard,
slices the top from her egg.

The second mate
is happy
A four-hour sleep,
full stomach
and a quiet sea
are all he craves

The child now sleeps, at last,
head firmly pressed into her pillow
in a deep sea-dream.

Then why are the gulls wheeling
like vultures in the sky?
Why was the child snatched
from her sleep? What drew
the Captain’s cry?


Only the wind replies
in the rigging,
and the hull creaks and sighs,
a sail spells out its message
over silent skies.
The wheel still turns
over bare decks,
shirts blow on the line;
the siren-song of lapping waves
still echoes over time.

Judith Nicholls

Happy Friday! I hope everyone has a fab weekend planned.

Friday Poetry

Happy Friday Everyone!

I hope everyone has bookish plans for the weekend.

My chosen poem for this week celebrates books, so it is a brilliant poem obviously.

There Is No Frigate Like A Book

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away,
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –
This Travel may the poorest take
Without offence of Toll –
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human soul.

Emily Dickinson


Emily Dickinson 1830-1886 and was an American poet. While Dickinson was a prolific poet, fewer than a dozen of her nearly 1800 poems were published during her lifetime. The poems published then, were usually edited significantly to fit conventional poetic rules. Her poems were unique for her era.

Mid Week Quote: Robert Frost

I hope everyone’s week is going well so far. I can’t quite believe we are already half way through May! Slow down 2019 you are going too fast.

This week my chosen quote is influenced by poetry.

 

“Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat.”

 

Attributed to Robert Frost (1960)

 

Robert Frost was one of the United States’ best loved poets and playwrights. He had four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry and a Congressional Gold Medal.

Have a great week!

 

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