Mid Week Quote: Robert Burns

Happy Burns Night!

Is anybody celebrating Burns Night tonight? I have celebrated by playing some Scottish music and eating some shortbread.

My chosen quote for today is obviously one by Robert Burns.

“Dare to be honest and fear no labor.”

Robert Burns

Happy Reading

Etsy

WWW Wednesday: 25/01/2023

WWW Wednesday is a meme hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.

The rules are answer the questions below and share a link to your blog in the comments section of Sam’s blog.

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you will read next?

Hello!

I hope everyone is having a good week so far. I saw a lovely thing today whilst at school. Children were outside during first break with their books reading together, apparently they have set up their own little bookclub and it was just wonderful to see a group of children enjoying reading together and talking about what they were reading.

What I am Currently Reading

I am only 15 pages into this so far as I started it during my lunch break at school today.

What I have Recently Finished Reading

I must admit I didn’t really enjoy Who Killed Jerusalem? that much. It was one of those books that felt too much like hard work. Here is the review. I just finished The Greek Myths by Richard Buxton and I absolutely loved it! Review will follow shortly.

What I Think I will Read Next

I think I will definitely read Meditations by Marcus Aurelius in February as that is my next ancient text I want to read but I’m not sure what other books I will read In February.

Please drop me a comment with your WWW Wednesday and I will head over for a visit.

Happy Reading

Etsy

If you enjoy reading my blog and would like to make a donation I would be very grateful. Thank you

Persephone Books

Hello!

Now you might have noticed that Persephone Books in Bath is one of my all time favourite book shops. I love the books that Persephone Books produce because they have introduced me to authors I have never come across before. After a few trips to Bath I have a growing collection of Persephone Books to read and this year I have decided to really make an effort to read the books I own and also increase my collection of Persephone Books.

So lets see how many of the Persephone Books I can read…

  1. William – an Englishman by Cicely Hamilton
  2. Mariana by Monica Dickens
  3. Someone at a Distance by Dorothy Whipple
  4. Fidelity by Susan Glaspell
  5. An Interrupted Life: The Diaries and Letters of Etty Hillesum 1941-42 by Etty Hillesum
  6. The Victorian Chaise-longue by Marghanita Laski
  7. The Home-Maker by Dorothy Canfield Fisher
  8. Good Evening, Mrs Craven: The Wartime Stories of Mollie Panter-Downes by Mollie Panter-Downes
  9. Few Eggs and No Oranges by Vere Hodgson
  10. Good Things in England by Florence White
  11. Julian Grenfell by Nicholas Mosley
  12. It’s Hard to Be Hip Over Thirty by Judith Viorst
  13. Consequences by E M Delafield
  14. Farewell Leicester Square by Betty Miller
  15. Tell It to a Stranger by Elizabeth Berridge
  16. Saplings by Noel Streatfield
  17. Marjory Fleming by Oriel Malet
  18. Every Eye by Isobel English
  19. They Knew Mr Knight by Dorothy Whipple
  20. A Woman’s Place: 1910-75 by Ruth Adam
  21. Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day by Winifred Watson
  22. Consider the Years by Viginia Graham
  23. Reuben Sachs by Amy Levy
  24. Family Roundabout by Richmal Crompton
  25. The Montana Stories by Katherine Mansfield
  26. Brook Evans by Susan Glaspell
  27. The Children who Lived in a Barn by Eleanor Graham
  28. Little Boy Lost by Marghanita Laski
  29. The Making of Marchioness by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  30. Kitchen Essays by Agnes Jekyll
  31. A House in the Country by Jocelyn Playfair
  32. The Carlyles at Home by Thea Holme
  33. The Far Cry by Emma Smith
  34. Minnie’s Room: The Peacetime Stories of Mollie Panter-Downes by Mollie Panter-Downes
  35. Greenery Street by Denis Mackail
  36. Lettice Delmer by Susan Miles
  37. The Runaway by Elizabeth Anna Hart
  38. Cheerful Weather for the Wedding by Julia Strachey
  39. Manja by Anna Gmeyner
  40. The Priory by Dorothy Whipple
  41. Hostages to Fortune by Elizabeth Cambridge
  42. The Blank Wall by Elisabeth Sanxay Holding
  43. The Wise Virgins by Leonard Woolf
  44. Tea with Mr Rochester by Frances Towers
  45. Good Food on the Aga by Ambrose Heath
  46. Miss Ranskill Comes Home by Barbara Euphan Todd
  47. The New House by Lettice Cooper
  48. The Casino by Margaret Bonham
  49. Bricks and Mortar by Helen Ashton
  50. The World that was Ours by Hilda Bernstein
  51. Operation Heartbreak by Duff Cooper
  52. The Village by Marghanita Laski
  53. Lady Rose and Mrs Memmary by Ruby Ferguson
  54. They can’t Ration These by Vicomte de Mauduit
  55. Flush by Virginia Woolf
  56. They Were Sisters by Dorothy Whipple
  57. The Hopkins Manuscript by RC Sherriff
  58. Hetty Dorval by Ethel Wilson
  59. There Were No Windows by Norah Hoult
  60. Doreen by Barbara Noble
  61. A London Child of the 1870s by Molly Hughes
  62. How To Run Your Home Without Help by Kay Smallshaw
  63. Princes in the Land by Joanna Cannan
  64. The Woman Novelist and Other Stories by Diana Gardner
  65. Alas, Poor Lady by Rachel Ferguson
  66. Gardener’s Nightcap by Muriel Stuart
  67. The Fortnight in September by RC Sherriff
  68. The Expendable Man by Dorothy B Hughes
  69. Journal by Katherine Mansfield
  70. Plats du Jour by Patience Gray
  71. The Shuttle by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  72. House-Bound by Winifred Peck
  73. The Young Pretenders by Edith Henrietta Fowler
  74. The Closed Door and Other Stories by Dorothy Whipple
  75. On the Other Side: Letters to my Children from Germany 1940–46 by Mathilde Wolff-Mönckeberg
  76. The Crowded Street by Winifred Holtby
  77. Daddy’s Gone A-Hunting by Penelope Mortimer
  78. A Very Great Profession by Nicola Beauman
  79. Round About a Pound a Week by Maud Pember Reeves
  80. The Country Housewife’s Book by Lucy H Yates
  81. Miss Buncle’s Book by DE Stevenson
  82. Amours de Voyage by Arthur Hugh Clough
  83. Making Conversation by Christine Longford
  84. A New System of Domestic Cookery by Mrs Rundell
  85. High Wages by Dorothy Whipple
  86. To Bed With Grand Music by Marghanita Laski
  87. Dimanche and Other Stories by Irène Némirovsky
  88. Still Missing by Beth Gutcheon
  89. The Mystery of Mrs Blencarrow by Mrs Oliphant
  90. The Winds of Heaven by Monica Dickens
  91. Miss Buncle Married by DE Stevenson
  92. Midsummer Night in the Workhouse by Diana Athill
  93. The Sack of Bath by Adam Fergusson
  94. No Surrender by Constance Maud
  95. Greenbanks by Dorothy Whipple
  96. Dinners for Beginners by Rachel and Margaret Ryan
  97. Harriet by Elizabeth Jenkins
  98. A Writer’s Diary by Virginia Woolf
  99. Patience by John Coates
  100. The Persephone Book of Short Stories by Persephone Books
  101. Heat Lightning by Helen Hull
  102. The Exiles Return by Elisabeth de Waal
  103. The Squire by Enid Bagnold
  104. The Two Mrs Abbotts by DE Stevenson
  105. Diary of a Provincial Lady by E M Delafield
  106. Into the Whirlwind by Eugenia Ginzburg
  107. Wilfred and Eileen by Jonathan Smith
  108. The Happy Tree by Rosalind Murray
  109. The Country Life Cookery Book by Ambrose Heath
  110. Because of the Lockwoods by Dorothy Whipple
  111. London War Notes by Mollie Panter-Downes
  112. Vain Shadow by Jane Hervey
  113. Greengates by RC Sherriff
  114. Gardeners’ Choice by Evelyn Dunbar and Charles Mahoney
  115. Maman, What Are We Called Now? by Jacqueline Mesnil-Amar
  116. A Lady and Her Husband by Amber Reeves
  117. The Godwits Fly by Robin Hyde
  118. Every Good Deed and Other Stories by Dorothy Whipple
  119. Long Live Great Bardfield by Tirzah Garwood
  120. Madame Solario by Gladys Huntington
  121. Effi Briest by Theodor Fontane
  122. Earth and High Heaven by Gwethalyn Graham
  123. Emmeline by Judith Rossner
  124. The Journey Home and Other Stories by Malachi Whitaker
  125. Guard Your Daughters by Diana Tutton
  126. Despised and Rejected by Rose Allatini
  127. Young Anne by Dorothy Whipple
  128. Tory Heaven by Marghanita Laski
  129. The Call by Edith Ayrton Zangwill
  130. National Provincial by Lettice Cooper
  131. Milton Place by Elisabeth de Waal
  132. The Second Persephone Book of Short Stories by Persephone Books
  133. Expiation by Elizabeth von Arnim
  134. A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf
  135. One Woman’s Year by Stella Martin Currey
  136. The Oppermanns by Lion Feuchtwanger
  137. English Climate: Wartime Stories by Sylvia Townsend Warner
  138. The New Magdalen by Wilkie Collins
  139. Random Commentary by Dorothy Whipple
  140. The Rector’s Daughter by F M Mayor
  141. The Deepening Stream by Dorothy Canfield Fisher
  142. As It Was by Helen Thomas
  143. A Well Full of Leaves by Elizabeth Myers
  144. The Other Day by Dorothy Whipple
  145. The Waters under the Earth by John Moore

I know the list is huge and books are always getting added but I would love to read more off the list.

Have you read any of these books?

Happy Reading

Etsy

Goodreads Monday: 23/01/2023

Goodreads Monday is now hosted by Budget Tales Book Club.  All you have to do is show off a book from your TBR that you’re looking forward to reading.

Happy Monday!

I hope everyone has had a good start to the week. I had an unexpected early finish today at school which was nice and I have a quiet day work wise tomorrow so I am hoping to go on a nice walk and catch up on some jobs.

This week I have chosen another book off my Classics Club list. I sadly didn’t read as many classics off my list as I had planned last year so this year I am really going to try and catch up and get a good load of books ticked off the list.

Candide is the story of a gentle man who, though pummelled and slapped in every direction by fate, clings desperately to the belief that he lives in “the best of all possible worlds.” On the surface a witty, bantering tale, this eighteenth-century classic is actually a savage, satiric thrust at the philosophical optimism that proclaims that all disaster and human suffering is part of a benevolent cosmic plan. Fast, funny, often outrageous, the French philosopher’s immortal narrative takes Candide around the world to discover that — contrary to the teachings of his distinguished tutor Dr. Pangloss — all is not always for the best. Alive with wit, brilliance, and graceful storytelling, Candide has become Voltaire’s most celebrated work.

Please drop me a comment if you have taken part in Goodreads Monday and I will head over for a visit.

Happy Reading

Etsy

If you enjoy reading my blog and would like to make a donation I would be very grateful. Thank you

The Weekly Brief

Hello!

I hope everyone has had a nice weekend so far. I am still on track with my reading goals and my book reviews so I am quite pleased. I’m not sure if it will last but I will keep trying.

Posts this Week

Currently Reading

I have been really enjoying The Greek Myths by Richard Buxton and I have been really enjoying it. I am still reading a chapter a day of The Count of Monte Cristo.

Happy Reading

Etsy

Who Killed Jerusalem? by George Albert Brown (Review #4)

Who Killed Jerusalem? By George Albert Brown

Blurb

In 1977, Ickey Jerusalem, San Francisco’s golden-boy poet laureate, is found dead in a locked, first-class toilet on an arriving red-eye flight.

Ded Smith, a desperately unhappy, intelligent philistine with a highly developed philosophy to match, is called in to investigate the poet’s death. Thus begins a series of hilarious encounters with the members of Jerusalem’s coterie.

Ded soon realizes that to find out what happened, he must not only collect his usual detective’s clues but also, despite his own poetically challenged outlook, get into the dead poet’s mind. Fighting his way through blasphemous funerals, drug-induced dreams, poetry-charged love-making, offbeat philosophical discussions, and much, much more, he begins to piece together Jerusalem’s seductive, all-encompassing metaphysics.

But by then, the attempts to kill Ded and the others have begun.

Before Ded’s death-dodging luck runs out, will he be able to solve the case, and perhaps in the process, develop a new way of looking at the world that might allow him to replace his unhappiness with joy?

Review

Firstly, I would like to say a massive thank you to Mindbuck Media Book Publicity for sending me an advance copy of this book. 

I was really excited to get the opportunity to read this book because I went through a massive William Blake phase when I was at University. I even composed a four part choral piece to Blake’s poem The Tyger and went to several exhibitions of his art work. This knowledge did help me whilst reading this book but I will be honest even at times I had to do some research to make sense of certain things which makes me worry that people with no experience of Blake’s work and his metaphysics would struggle with this book. 

There are some great characters within this book and some characters that I really did not get along with. Sadly, the one character I really did not like was Ded. Ded is rather a sad character who has not had a very happy life so far. His childhood was sheltered and not happy and he has basically been just going through life working and just existing. Although I felt sorry for Ded I really did not like how he acted and found him painfully socially awkward. I also did not like his sexual habits very much. The other character I did not particularly like was Beulah. I found Beulah to be rather childish and very naive. At times I felt sorry for her but at the same time I just wanted her to get angry and react to things. 

Most of the members of Jerusalem’s coterie were hilarious and were the reason I kept reading the book. Ghostflea the chauffeur was definitely my favourite character. Ghostflea had an interesting upbringing and I love how he learnt to drive by reading a book. The image of an erratic driver who really can’t drive driving like a drunk person around San Fransisco in an English hearse was hilarious and had me laughing a great deal. 

The other character that had me laughing was Tharmas. Tharmas basically spends his life as high as a kite and going from one sexual encounter to the next. It was hard to imagine him as a business manager for Jerusalem. 

I will be honest I did find this book a hard slog and what made it worse was that I guessed who the killer was very early on and when I was right it felt like rather a let down and extremely predictable. The ending where Ded explains all his theories in the plane was in my opinion not needed and it felt like Brown was trying to imitate a Poirot book but not as successfully as Christie. Overall, if this book had been shorter I think I would have enjoyed it more but from about half way through it was becoming too much like hard work. I give this book 3 out of 5 Dragons. 

🐲🐲🐲

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About the author

George Albert Brown, a graduate of Yale University and Stanford Law, started as a hippie in San Francisco’s Haight Ashbury and retired at the age of 40 after having co-founded a successful international finance company. Following stints thereafter as a humorous author (The Airline Passenger’s Guerrilla Handbook) and an angel investor in over a score of high-tech university spinouts, he built a catamaran in Chile and for more than a decade, cruised it across the globe with his significant other. Today, as a father of three grown children, a grandfather of four not-yet-grown children, and an involuntary lover of stray cats, he continues her peripatetic lifestyle by other means.

Etsy

If you enjoy reading my blog and would like to make a donation I would be very grateful. Thank you

Friday Poetry: Claude McKay

Happy Friday!

I hope everyone has some fab books to read over the weekend.

My chosen poem this week is by the Jamaican- American poet and writer Claude McKay (1890-1948). McKay studied in the United States and became a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance.

After the Winter

Some day, when trees have shed their leaves
And against the morning's white
The shivering birds beneath the eaves
Have sheltered for the night,
We'll turn our faces southward, love, 
Toward the summer isle
Where bamboos spire the shafted grove
And wide-mouthed orchids smile.

And we will seek the quiet hill
Where towers the cotton tree,
And leaps the laughing crystal rill,
And works the droning bee,
And we will build a cottage there
Beside an open glade,
With black-ribbed blue-bells blowing near,
And ferns that never fade. 

Claude McKay

Happy Reading

Etsy

Lyra’s Pawsome Books #6

Hello!

I thought it was time for another Etsy update as I have been quite busy putting new products on the website. I also have a 10% discount code available for my book bloggers. LADYBOOKDRAGON10.

Book A Month

I had been wanting to do this product for a long time and over Christmas I finally got enough time to wrap loads of books.

Blind Date with a Book Valentine’s edition

This Valentine’s edition Blind Date with a Book contains a heart themed chocolate lollipop and a brand new paperback book of a genre of your choice plus a lotus biscuit. There is also the option to send a personal message on a book themed postcard in the parcel. There is also an everyday themed Blind Date with a Book available.

TBR Jar Refills.

Celebration Cards

There are quite a few cards now available on the Etsy site as well.

Balloon Card

Cat Themed Card

Thank you for visiting my little shop. More products will be arriving soon!

Mid Week Quote: Billie Burke

My chosen quote for this week is by the American actress who was famous on Broadway and radio, and in silent and sound films Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Burke (1884-1970), otherwise known as Billie Burke. She was best known for her role as Glinda the Good Witch of the North in the musical The Wizard of Oz (1939).

 “Age is of no importance unless you’re a cheese.”

Billie Burke

Happy Reading

WWW Wednesday: 18/01/2023

WWW Wednesday is a meme hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.

The rules are answer the questions below and share a link to your blog in the comments section of Sam’s blog.

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you will read next?

Hello!

I hope everyone is well. Reading hasn’t been going quite so well this week, I’ve still managed some reading everyday but not as much as I would like.

What I am Currently Reading

The more I read this book the more bizarre it gets. I like how the author has used creations by William Blake within this book but at the same time it is just to strange and I really don’t like the main character.

What I have Recently Finished Reading

I throughly enjoyed this book and it was great to get back into reading my classics again. Here is the review if you are interested.

What I Think I will Read Next

I have so many books I want to read this year and because of this I plan to be a lot more restrained with my book buying.

Please drop me a comment with your WWW Wednesday and I will head over for a visit.

Happy Reading

Etsy