ABC Book Challenge: H

Time for another instalment of the ABC Book Challenge.

I hope everyone has had a good start to the week so far.

 

Books I have loved beginning with H

 

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Harlequin by Bernard Cornwell

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling

Helen of Troy by Margaret George

Heretic by Bernard Cornwell

Heroes and Villains by Angela Carter

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

Holes by Louis Sachar

Hood by Stephen R. Lawhead

Howard’s End by E. M. Forster

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

 

Books on my TBR list beginning with H

 

Hades’ Daughter by Charlotte Carol

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Rather surprisingly I only have one book on my TBR list beginning with H!

I would love to hear your thoughts on some of these books. Please feel free to drop me comment. Also if you are taking part in the ABC Book Challenge please drop me your link in the comments and I will head over and check it out. 

 

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Anticipated Releases Book Tag

Hello everyone

Today I am taking part in the Anticipated Releases book Tag. A massive thank you to Blair for tagging me.

 

So here are the rules…

  • Thank the person (or persons) who nominated you
  • Answer all the questions down below
  • Pingback to the creator: Ellyn @ Allonsythornraxx
  • Nominate 5+ bloggers to do this tag

 

Your most anticipated release of the year…

Well the book I was most looking forward to this year came out a couple of weeks ago.

Tidelands by Philippa Gregory

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A book you are not anticipating…

The Book of Dust: The Secret Commonwealth by Philip Pullman

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I will be honest with you, I really cannot stand Philip Pullman’s books, I have tried several times and always end up giving up. My husband however is eagerly awaiting the release of this book, hence why he named the cats Lyra and Pan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most underhyped anticipated release…

I’m not entirely sure on this but I have chosen a book I am looking forward to but does not appear on the top of lists of up coming releases on Waterstones.

A Silent Death by Peter May

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A book you’ve been waiting on forever…

Winds of Winter by George R. R. Martin

When will this book ever come out? I’m not sure I can wait much longer.

 

Your top 3 ‘can’t-wait’ books of the year…

 

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood

The Library Book by Susan Orlean

The Quiet at the End of the World by Lauren James

 

Top 5 most anticipated backlist books on your TBR…

Death of Darkness by Dianne Duvall

Star Trek Discovery: The Enterprise War by John Jackson Miller

Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King and Owen King

Heads you Win by Jeffrey Archer

Jeeves and the King of Clubs by Ben Schott

 

I nominate: – Becky | Sara | Sarah | Sofi | Amanda

 

That’s it for now.

Happy Reading

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Down the TBR Hole #14

Down the TBR Hole was the brain child of Lost In A Story. The idea is to reduce the length of your Goodreads TBR.

How it works:

  • Go to your Goodreads want to read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added
  • Take the first 5 or 10 books.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go

 

Hello everyone

I hope everyone is enjoying the glorious weather we have been having. This was meant to be yesterdays post, so apologies for the delay.

The total is at 471!

 

1. City of Bones by Cassandra Clare

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When fifteen-year-old Clary Fray heads out to the Pandemonium Club in New York City, she hardly expects to witness a murder― much less a murder committed by three teenagers covered with strange tattoos and brandishing bizarre weapons. Then the body disappears into thin air. It’s hard to call the police when the murderers are invisible to everyone else and when there is nothing―not even a smear of blood―to show that a boy has died. Or was he a boy?

This is Clary’s first meeting with the Shadowhunters, warriors dedicated to ridding the earth of demons. It’s also her first encounter with Jace, a Shadowhunter who looks a little like an angel and acts a lot like a jerk. Within twenty-four hours Clary is pulled into Jace’s world with a vengeance when her mother disappears and Clary herself is attacked by a demon. But why would demons be interested in ordinary mundanes like Clary and her mother? And how did Clary suddenly get the Sight? The Shadowhunters would like to know…

I own the complete set of these books and have been planning on reading them for a very long time. Maybe I should get a move on and at least read the first one in the series.

KEEP

 

2. The Scarlett Pimpernel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy

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Armed with only his wits and his cunning, one man recklessly defies the French revolutionaries and rescues scores of innocent men, women, and children from the deadly guillotine. His friends and foes know him only as the Scarlet Pimpernel. But the ruthless French agent Chauvelin is sworn to discover his identity and to hunt him down.

 

 

 

 

I have fond memories of watching ‘The Scarlett Pimpernel’ on TV when I was little, I think Richard E. Grant played the famous Pimpernel. This will definitely stay on the list as I would really like to read it.

KEEP

 

3. The Winter of Our Discontent by John Steinbeck

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Ethan Allen Hawley, the protagonist of Steinbeck’s last novel, works as a clerk in a grocery store that his family once owned. With Ethan no longer a member of Long Island’s aristocratic class, his wife is restless, and his teenage children are hungry for the tantalizing material comforts he cannot provide. Then one day, in a moment of moral crisis, Ethan decides to take a holiday from his own scrupulous standards.

Set in Steinbeck’s contemporary 1960 America, the novel explores the tenuous line between private and public honesty that today ranks it alongside his most acclaimed works of penetrating insight into the American condition. This edition features an introduction and notes by Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.

I’ve only read two of Steinbeck’s book and although I loved ‘Of Mice and Men’ I hated ‘The Pearl’, so I am rather hesitant on trying another book by Steinbeck. I think for now I will remove it from the list.

GO

 

4. Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier

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The coachman tried to warn her away from the ruined, forbidding place on the rainswept Cornish coast. But young Mary Yellan chose instead to honor her mother’s dying request that she join her frightened Aunt Patience and huge, hulking Uncle Joss Merlyn at Jamaica Inn. From her first glimpse on that raw November eve, she could sense the inn’s dark power. But never did Mary dream that she would become hopelessly ensnared in the vile, villainous schemes being hatched within its crumbling walls — or that a handsome, mysterious stranger would so incite her passions … tempting her to love a man whom she dares not trust.

 

 

I really need to read some Daphne du Maurier! I own so many of her books and ashamedly I have not read one. I know, this needs to change.

KEEP

 

5. Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens

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Dickens’s first historical novel is a thrilling tale of murder, treachery, and forbidden love with rioting mob scenes to make any reader’s hair stand on end
 Barnaby Rudge is a young innocent simpleton who is devoted to his talkative raven, Grip. When he gets caught up in the mayhem of the Gordon riots and a mysterious unsolved murder, his life is put in jeopardy. This is a powerful historical tale of forbidden love, abduction, and the dangerous power of the mob.

 

 

 

As per usual all Dickens has to stay on the list.

KEEP

Just 5 books today and only 1 leaving the list. I must admit doing this challenge is making me realise just how many books I want to read.

If there are any books on the list today that you have read and want to drop me a comment about, please do.

Happy Reading!

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ABC Book Challenge: G

This post should have been last week but I was sadly behind posting, thankfully I have all caught up now.

So here is the next letter in the ABC Book Challenge, if you would like to see my previous posts please click on the links below:

A | B | C | D |E | F |

 

Books I have loved beginning with G

A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Gin O’clock by The Queen [of Twitter]

The Gods Trilogy by Terry Pratchett

Going Postal by Terry Pratchett

Good Wives by Louisa May Alcott

Gooseberries by Anton Chekov

The Great Hunt by Robert Jordan

Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett

 

Books on my TBR list beginning with G

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracey Chevalier

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

 

If anybody has read any of these books please drop me a comment with your thoughts.

Happy Reading.

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Down the TBR Hole #13

Down the TBR Hole was the brain child of Lost In A Story. The idea is to reduce the length of your Goodreads TBR.

How it works:

  • Go to your Goodreads want to read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added
  • Take the first 5 or 10 books.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go

 

It’s that time again, lets see if I can shrink this TBR list down. The list is currently at 472.

1. Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell

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Set in English society before the 1832 Reform Bill, Wives and Daughters centres on the story of youthful Molly Gibson, brought up from childhood by her father. When he remarries, a new step-sister enters Molly’s quiet life – loveable, but worldly and troubling, Cynthia. The narrative traces the development of the two girls into womanhood within the gossiping and watchful society of Hollingford.

 

 

 

My aim is to one day read all of Elizabeth Gaskell’s books so this will stay on the list.

KEEP

 

2. The Complete Poems of Emily Jane Bronte

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In 1846 a small book entitled Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell appeared on the British literary scene. The three pseudonymous poets, the Bronte sisters, went on to unprecedented success with such novels as Wuthering Heights, Agnes Grey, and Jane Eyre, all published in the following year. As children, these English sisters had begun writing poems and stories about an imaginary country named Gondal, yet they never sought to publish any of their work until Charlotte’s discovery of Emily’s more mature poems in the autumn of 1845, Charlotte later recalled: “I accidentally lighted on a MS. volume of verse in my sister Emily’s handwriting… I looked it over, and something more than surprise seized me – a deep conviction that these were not common effusions, nor at all like the poetry women generally write. I thought them condensed and terse, vigorous and genuine. To my ear they had also a peculiar musicwild, melancholy, and elevating.” The renowned Hatfield edition of The Complete Poems of Emily Jane Bronte includes the poetry that captivated Charlotte Bronte a century and a half ago, a body of work that continues to resonate today. This incomparable volume includes Emily’s verse from Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell as well as 200 works collected from various manuscript sources after her death in 1848. Some were edited and preserved by Charlotte and Arthur Bell Nichols; still others were discovered years later by Bronte scholars. Originally released in 1923, Hatfield’s collection was the result of a remarkable attempt over twenty years to isolate Emily’s poems from her sisters’ and to achieve chronological order. Accompanied by an interpretive preface on “The Gondal Story” byMiss Fannie E. Ratchford, author of The Brontes Web of Childhood, this edition is the definitive collection of Emily Bronte’s poetical works. In 1846 a small book entitled Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell appeared on the British literary scene. The three pseudonymous poets, the Bronte sisters, went on to unprecedented success with such novels as Wuthering Heights, Agnes Grey, and Jane Eyre, all published in the following year. As children, these English sisters had begun writing poems and stories about an imaginary country named Gondal, yet they never sought to publish any of their work until Charlotte’s discovery of Emily’s more mature poems in the autumn of 1845, Charlotte later recalled: “I accidentally lighted on a MS. volume of verse in my sister Emily’s handwriting… I looked it over, and something more than surprise seized me – a deep conviction that these were not common effusions, nor at all like the poetry women generally write. I thought them condensed and terse, vigorous and genuine. To my ear they had also a peculiar musicwild, melancholy, and elevating.” The renowned Hatfield edition of The Complete Poems of Emily Jane Bronte includes the poetry that captivated Charlotte Bronte a century and a half ago, a body of work that continues to resonate today. This incomparable volume includes Emily’s verse from Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell as well as 200 works collected from various manuscript sources after her death in 1848. Some were edited and preserved by Charlotte and Arthur Bell Nichols; still others were discovered years later by Bronte scholars. Originally released in 1923, Hatfield’s collection was the result of a remarkable attempt over twenty years to isolate Emily’s poems from her sisters’ and to achieve chronological order. Accompanied by an interpretive preface on “The Gondal Story” byMiss Fannie E. Ratchford, author of The Brontes Web of Childhood, this edition is the definitive collection of Emily Bronte’s poetical works.

This is a tricky one because although I love the novels of the Bronte sisters I really have not got on well with their poetry, especially Emilys’. I’m not sure why but I struggle with her poems and do not enjoy them, so for now I think I will take this off the list.

GO

 

3. Life of St Columba by Adomnan of Iona 

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Founding father of the famous monastery on the island of Iona, a site of pilgrimage ever since his death in 597, St Columba was born into one of the ruling families in Ireland at a time of immense expansion for the Irish Church. This account of his life, written by Adomnán – the ninth abbot of Iona, and a distant relative of St Columba – describes his travels from Ireland to Scotland and his mission in the cause of Celtic Christianity there. Written 100 years after St Columba’s death, it draws on written and oral traditions to depict a wise abbot among his monks, who like Christ was capable of turning water into wine, controlling sea-storms and raising the dead. An engaging account of one of the central figures in the ‘Age of Saints’, this is a major work of early Irish and Scottish history.

I love Iona and the history and I have actually read certain parts of this book but not all of the book. I will keep this on the list as I would like to read it all.

KEEP

 

4. The Idiot by Fydor Dostoevsky

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Returning to Russia from a sanitarium in Switzerland, the Christ-like epileptic Prince Myshkin finds himself enmeshed in a tangle of love, torn between two women—the notorious kept woman Nastasya and the pure Aglaia—both involved, in turn, with the corrupt, money-hungry Ganya. In the end, Myshkin’s honesty, goodness, and integrity are shown to be unequal to the moral emptiness of those around him. In her revision of the Garnett translation, Anna Brailovsky has corrected inaccuracies wrought by Garnett’s drastic anglicization of the novel, restoring as much as possible the syntactical structure of the original story.

 

 

I love Russian literature so this just has to stay.

KEEP

 

5. Life after Life by Kate Atkinson

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What if you could live again and again, until you got it right?

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born to an English banker and his wife. She dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in a variety of ways, while the young century marches on towards its second cataclysmic world war.

Does Ursula’s apparently infinite number of lives give her the power to save the world from its inevitable destiny? And if she can – will she?

I’m not sure why I added this book because I do not remember anything about it but after reading the blurb I will take it off the list. I really do not like books that have characters with endless lives, or books that repeat one period of time over and over again until the loop is broken.

GO

Just 5 books today but 2 books off the list and down to 470. If you have read any of these books and would like to drop me a comment please do.

Happy Reading

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ABC Book Challenge: F

It is time for another instalment of the ABC Book Challenge and this letter is F.

If you would like to see the previous letters please click on the links below:

A | B | C | D | E |

 

Books I have loved beginning with F

 

The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them by Newt Scamander, J. K. Rowling

The Far Side of the World by Patrick O’Brien

Feet of Clay by Terry Pratchett

Felix the Railway Cat by Kate Moore

The Fifth Elephant by Terry Pratchett

Fireside Gothic by Andrew Taylor

The First Christmas and Other Bible Stories From the New Testament by Enid Blyton

Five at the Office Christmas Party by Bruno Vincent

Five Escape Brexit Island by Bruno Vincent

Five Forget Mother’s Day by Bruno Vincent

Five Give Up the Booze by Bruno Vincent

Five Go Adventuring Again by Enid Blyton

Five Go Off in a Caravan by Enid Blyton

Five Go to Smuggler’s Top by Enid Blyton

Five Lose Dad in the Garden Centre by Bruno Vincent

Five on a Treasure Island by Enid Blyton

Five on Brexit Island by Bruno Vincent

Five on Kirrin Island Again by Enid Blyton

Five Run Away Together by Enid Blyton

Flying Ace: Jack Fairfax, Royal Flying Corps, 1915-1918 by Jim Eldridge

The Fox and the Star by Coralie Bickford-Smith

Books on my TBR list beginning with F

 

Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

Far from the Tree by Robin Benway

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincott, Mikki Daughtry, Tobias Iaconis

 

So that is another letter complete. I hope everyone has had a good weekend.

There are certain books that have review links attached, just click the book title.

Please drop me a comment if you have read any of the books above and want to chat.

Happy reading.

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p.s. I have a massive Famous Five addiction.

 

Down the TBR Hole #12

Down the TBR Hole was the brain child of Lost In A Story. The idea is to reduce the length of your Goodreads TBR.

How it works:

  • Go to your Goodreads want to read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added
  • Take the first 5 or 10 books.
  • Read the synopses of the books.
  • Decide: keep it or should it go

 

Hello everyone!

It is that time again where I try and clear up my TBR list on Goodreads. I will see how it goes because Goodreads has gone a bit crazy on me recently marking certain books as read instead of to read and also messing up the order on TBR list. Has anybody else had this problem recently?

To visit my previous posts please click on the links below.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 |

 

1. Ninety- Three by Victor Hugo

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Ninety-three, the last of Victor Hugo’s novels, is regarded by many including such diverse critics as Robert Louis Stevenson and André Maurois as his greatest work.

1793, Year Two of the Republic, saw the establishment of the National Convention, the execution of Louis XVI, the Terror, and the monarchist revolt in the Vendée, brutally suppressed by the Republic. Hugo’s epic follows three protagonists through this tumultuous year: the noble royalist de Lantenac; Gauvain, who embodies a benevolent and romantic vision of the Republic; and Cimourdain, whose principles are altogether more robespierrean.The conflict of values culminates in a dramatic climax on the scaffold.

This will definitely stay on the list as I aim to read all of Victor Hugo’s books.

KEEP.

 

2. Patriot Games by Tom Clancy

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It is fall. Years before the defection of a Soviet submarine will send him hurtling into confrontation with the Soviets, historian, ex-Marine and CIA analyst Jack Ryan is vacationing in London with his wife and young daughter, when a terrorist attack takes place before his eyes. Instinctively, he dives forward to break it up, and is shot. It is not until he wakes up in the hospital that he learns whose lives he has saved — the Prince and Princess of Wales and their new young son — and which enemies he has made — the Ulster Liberation Army, an ultra-left-wing splinter of the IRA.

By his impulsive act, he has gained both the gratitude of a nation and then enmity of hits most dangerous men — men who do not sit on their hate. And in the weeks and months to come, it is Jack Ryan, and his family, who will become the targets of that hate.

I have owned this book for years because I love the film adaptation. I must admit I tried to read the book but gave up in the end but this was when I was at University and trying to write quite a few essays. I will give the book one more try.

KEEP

 

3. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street by Anonymous

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A sensational story of murder and pie-making, Sweeney Todd is a classic of British horror writing, widely adapted in print and on stage, most famously by Stephen Sondheim, whose unlikely “musical thriller” won eight Tony awards. This edition offers the original story with all its atmospheric Victorian trimmings. The story of Todd’s murderous partnership with pie-maker Margery Lovett–at once inconceivably unpalatable and undeniably compelling–has subsequently set the table for a seemingly endless series of successful dramatic adaptations, popular songs and ballads, novellas, radio plays, graphic novels, ballets, films, and musicals. Both gleeful and ghoulish, the original tale of Sweeney Todd, first published under the title The String of Pearls, combines the story of Todd’s grisly method of robbing and dispatching his victims–by way of Mrs. Lovett’s meat pies–with a romantic sub-plot involving deception, disguise, and detective work, set against the backdrop of London’s dark and unsavory streets. Editor Robert Mack ‘fleshes’ out the story with a fascinating introduction touching on the origins of the tale, the growth of the legend, and a history of its many retellings. Mack also includes explanatory notes that point out interesting aspects, plus a full chronology of the many versions of Sweeney Todd.
Since Sweeney Todd first entered the public imagination in the mid-nineteenth-century, his exploits have chilled and fascinated audiences around the world. This new edition allows modern readers to savor the ghastly original in all its gruesome glory.

To be honest horror is not really my cup of tea and I’m not sure I would have the stomach to read this. I think I added it because I had watched the film but I think now I will remove it from the list as I can’t see myself reading it.

GO

 

4. Labyrinth (Languedoc #1) by Kate Mosse

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In the Pyrenees mountains near Carcassonne, Alice, a volunteer at an archaeological dig, stumbles into a cave and makes a startling discovery-two crumbling skeletons, strange writings on the walls, and the pattern of a labyrinth. Eight hundred years earlier, on the eve of a brutal crusade that will rip apart southern France, a young woman named Alais is given a ring and a mysterious book for safekeeping by her father. The book, he says, contains the secret of the true Grail, and the ring, inscribed with a labyrinth, will identify a guardian of the Grail. Now, as crusading armies gather outside the city walls of Carcassonne, it will take a tremendous sacrifice to keep the secret of the labyrinth safe.

 

I am ashamed to say I have owned this book since it came out and I also own most of the series but I have not read any of them. This I intend to change, so the book will definitely stay on the list.

KEEP

 

5. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

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David Copperfield is the story of a young man’s adventures on his journey from an unhappy and impoverished childhood to the discovery of his vocation as a successful novelist. Among the gloriously vivid cast of characters he encounters are his tyrannical stepfather, Mr Murdstone; his brilliant, but ultimately unworthy school-friend James Steerforth; his formidable aunt, Betsey Trotwood; the eternally humble, yet treacherous Uriah Heep; frivolous, enchanting Dora Spenlow; and the magnificently impecunious Wilkins Micawber, one of literature’s great comic creations. In David Copperfield – the novel he described as his ‘favourite child’ – Dickens drew revealingly on his own experiences to create one of the most exuberant and enduringly popular works, filled with tragedy and comedy in equal measure. This edition uses the text of the first volume publication of 1850, and includes updated suggestions for further reading, original illustrations by ‘Phiz’, a revised chronology and expanded notes. In his new introduction, Jeremy Tambling discusses the novel’s autobiographical elements, and its central themes of memory and identity.

It is a Dickens novel it stays!

KEEP

 

6. The Maps of Tolkien’s Middle-Earth

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Best-selling Tolkien expert Brian Sibley (The Lord of the Rings: The Making of the Movie Trilogy and The Lord of the Rings Official Movie Guide) presents a slipcased collection of four full-color, large-format maps of Tolkien’s imaginary realm illustrated by John Howe, a conceptual designer for the blockbuster films directed by Peter Jackson. The set includes a hardcover book describing in detail the importance and evolution of geography within Tolkien’s epic fiction and four color maps presented with minimal folds, including two (Beleriand and Númenor) never before published in this country.

 

I do love all things Tolkien but I prefer the books by Tolkien so I doubt I will read this. I might do one day but for now it can come off the list.

GO

 

7. The Enchanted Wood by Enid Blyton

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Jo, Bessie and Fanny move to the country and find an Enchanted Wood right on their doorstep. In the magic Faraway Tree live the magical characters that soon become their new friends – Moon-Face, Silky the fairy, and Saucepan Man. Together they visit the strange lands (the Roundabout Land, the Land of Ice and Snow, Toyland and the Land of Take What You Want) atop the tree and have the most exciting adventures – and narrow escapes.

 

 

 

 

Oh the memories! I remember being at primary school sat on the carpet and the headmistress reading this book to us all. This definitely stays on the list because I would love to read it and relive some memories.

KEEP

 

8. The Vicomte De Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas

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The Vicomte de Bragelonne opens an epic adventure which continues with Louise de La Valliere and reaches its climax in The Man in the Iron Mask. This new edition of the classic translation presents a key episode in the Musketeers saga, fully annotated and with an introduction by a leading Dumas scholar.

 

 

 

 

 

I love Dumas and I have read The Three Musketeers so many times my copy fell apart. This will definitely stay on the list as I would love to read all the books in the series.

KEEP

 

9. Queen Margot by Alexandre Dumas

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Released to coincide with the new Miramac film starring Isabelle Adjani, this is the classic novel unavailable for over 25 years. Massacres, conspiracies, clandestine trysts, secret alliances, daring escapes, sumptuous feasts, and duels of wit propel the action in this delightful story of French royalty during the 16th century. 

 

 

 

 

 

Another Dumas, need I say more?

KEEP

 

10. Louise De La Valliere by Alexandre Dumas

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It is early summer, 1661, and the royal court of France is in turmoil. Can it be true that the King is in love with the Duchess d’Orleans? Or has his eye been caught by the sweet and gentle Louise de la Valliere? No one is more anxious to know the answer than Raoul, son of Athos, who loves Louise more than life itself. Behind the scenes, dark intrigues are afoot. Louis XIV is intent on making himself absolute master of France. Imminent crisis shakes the now ageing Musketeers and d’Artagnan out of their complacent retirement, but is the cause just?

 

KEEP

 

So that is another 10 books sorted and I have only got rid of 2! The list is now down to 471, I will get there eventually. 

If you have read any of these books please drop me a comment of what your thoughts are.

Happy Reading.

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